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  • 0 About Jodhpur (Rajasthan) Travel Information

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    About Jodhpur (Rajasthan) Travel Information Jodhpur is the land of Royalty is a glittering jewel in the golden sands of the barren desert landscape. The light that reflects of the golden sands engulf a land renowned for its vibrant colours, people in the bright clothes and beautiful jewellery, living in city dotted and dominated by towering fort and palaces that rise from sand like a mirage. Besides a tour of the massive and impregnable Mehrangarh Fort, we also decide to go Native here. We ride horse carriages, as do the natives, to the Clock Tower Bazaar. This is guaranteed to be a fun experience as the carriage plods along through bustling parts of the Old city. The Clock Tower bazaar itself is a fascinating and colourful "you name it we have it" kind of bazaar. Palaces to See Mehrangarh FortSituated on a steep hill, Mehrangarh fort is one of the largest forts in India. The beauty and the grandeur of numerous palaces in the fort narrates a saga of hard sandstones yielding to the chisels of skilled Jodhpuri sculptures. Umaid Bhawan PalaceThe only palace built in 20th century under the famine relief programme, has now been converted into a hotel with some parts being retained as a museum. Jaswant ThadaThe 19th century royal cenotaph is built in white marble, in commemoration of Maharaja Jaswant Singh. Some rare portraits of the rulers of Jodhpur are also displayed here. MUSEUMSGovernment MuseumThis museum has a rich collection of weapons, textiles, miniature portraits, local crafts and images of Jain Tirthankars. It is situated in the middle of the Umaid public gardens. EXCURSIONSCITIESMandore : Towards the north of Jodhpur is the ancient capital of Marwar, Mandore. It is just 8 kms from the city. Main attractions of the place are Hall of Heroes with sixteen huge figures carved out of a single rock, the shrine of 330 million Gods and the royal cenotaphs. But one can not miss the caves in crags and the sprawling gardens, which are now shelter place for monkeys and peacocks. Greenery of the place makes Mandore, in true sense, an oasis. TEMPLESOssian : 65-km from Jodhpur, lie ruins of an ancient city called Ossian. This city is famous for Brahmanical and Jain temples, which belong to 8th and 11th century. Surya or Sun temple and the Sachiya temples are famous for their beauty. The 'shikhar' of Sachiya temple is clustered by two rows of turrets, an ambulatory and a large assembly hall with an elaborate ceiling. TRIBESGuda Bishnoi : The villages are inhabitated by the Bishnoi tribe who are staunch believers in the sanctity of plant and animal life. Villages are marked by Khejri trees and deers, which thrive there. 25 kms from Jodhpur. LAKES AND PALACESBalsamand Lake & Palace : This picturesque artificial lake is 7 kms from the main city. Summer palaces along the embankment and a bird sanctuary has made it a picnic spot. Sardar Samand Lake and Palace : Rajasthani village life and vibrant cultural colours come alive as you drive along the 55 kms stretch. The monotony of the drive is broken by Chinkaras and Black Bucks who frisk pass the road.

  • 0 About Pushkar (Rajasthan) Travel Information

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    About Pushkar (Rajasthan) Travel Information Pushkar for a devout Hindu Pushkar is a very important pilgrim centre, for one visit to this holy place in a lifetime is highly prescribed. Brahma forms the great Hindu trilogy of Brahma, Vishnu and Shiva, each symbolising the lifecycle of birth, preservation and destruction. Brahma the creator is depicted as of four bearded heads and four hands each holding a book of Vedas (knowledge). His vehicle is the swan and his consort is Savitri. According to the legend Pushkar means a pond created by flower, was formed when Brahma dropped a lotus flower on the earth to determine a place for his yagna, a holy sacrifice. The story goes that Brahma wanted to perform the yagna at the most auspicious time but his consort Savitri whose presence at the yagna was vital for its performance kept him waiting. Irritated by this Brahma married Gayatri, a milkmaid and installed her instead. Savitri on seeing someone else in her place was infuriated and cursed Brahma that he would be forgotten by people on earth and never worshiped. She relented on pleas from other Gods that he could only be worshiped in Pushkar, hence there are no Brahma Temples elsewhere Fair & Festivals Pushkar Fair The well-known and marked with largest participation of all the festivals of Rajasthan, Pushkar is an important pilgrimage as well as the venue of a mammoth cattle fair. Bazaars, auctions, music and sports are highlight of this event. The Pushkar Fair, a major tourist attraction draws people from all over the globe to the ancient and secluded environment of Pushkar town. Pushkar Fair is perhaps the largest cattle fair in the world. Rajasthan which is enriched by cattle wealth is the home to many recognized breeds of cattle.The world-famous Fair is held in the sacred and peaceful town of Pushkar, 11 kms. north-west of Ajmer. It transforms into a spectacular fair ground for twelve days during the month of Kartik (Oct-Nov). Rajasthan's most famous fair, it brings together camel traders, pilgrims visitors, and those who're here simply to participate in one of the season's most colorful social events, Besides tented camps, there are hundreds of shops selling everything from handicrafts to spices, foodstuff and jewellery, for visitors a number of activities are also arranged but most simply with to stay within fair grounds to watch the fascinating Rajasthani village metamorphose before their eyes. Pushkar HistoryHistorically, Pushkar always had great strategic importance and was sacked by Mahumud of Ghazni on one of his periodic forays from Afghanistan. Later it became a favorite residence of the great Moghula. One of the first contacts between the Moghula and the British occurred in Pushkar when Sir Thomas Roe met with Jahangir here in 1616. The city was subsequently taken by the Scindias and, in 1818, it was handed over to the British, becoming one of the few places in Rajasthan controlled directly by British rather than being part of a princely state. Places to see TemplesPushkar boasts temples, through few are as ancient pilgrimage site many were destroyed by Aurangzeb and subsequently rebuilt. The most famous is what is said to be the only temple in India dedicated to Brahma. It's marked by a red spire and over the entrance gateway is the Hans, or goose symbol, of Brahma, who is said to have personally chosen Pushkar as its site. The Rangji Temple chosen is also important.The one - hour trek up to the hilltop temple overlooking the lake is best made early in the morning; the view is magnificent.Ghats Numerous ghats run down to the lake, and pilgrims are constantly bathing in the lake's holy waters. If you wish to join them, do it with respect - remove your shoes, don't smoke and don't take photographs. This is not Varanasi and the pilgrims here can be very touchy about insensitive instruction by non - Hindus.

  • 0 Ranthambore National Park & Sanctuary (Rajasthan)

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    Ranthambore National Park & Sanctuary (Rajasthan) Ranthambore is situated about 12 km away from Sawai Madhopur. Ranthambore lies on the easternmost spurof the Aravalis. Ranthambore was the private tiger reserve of the Maharajas of Jaipur. It is studded with pavilions, watch towers. The town of Ranthambore is watched over by the massive Ranthambore fort. The mainattractions of Ranthambore are the Ranthambore National Park and Ranthambore Fort.Ranthambore National Park is in Sawai Madhopur District of Rajasthan state. Located at the junction of the Aravalli and Vindhya hill range, this is one of the finest places to view animals, especially as they are used to being stared at here.The park covers an area of Approximately 400 sq Km and if combined it with the area of sawai man singh sanctuary area,it is around 500 Sq km. The main attraction of this park is Tiger.In this park one can view other animals like Sambhar, Cheetal, WildBoar, Leopard, Sloth Bear, Jackal and Hyena. The other main attraction ofRanthambore is the Ranthambore fort. This fort was built in 994 AD atop a steep high creek 200 metres above sea level. Ruined pavilions, walls, chhatris and splendid monuments are interspersed within the majestic fort. Ranthambore national park was declared a wildlife sanctuary in 1957 and in 1974 it gained the protection of "Project Tiger". It got it's status of a National Park in 1981. Ranthambore National Park is dotted with structures that remind you of bygone eras.There are many water bodies located all over the park, which provide perfect relief during the extremely hot summer months for the forest inhabitants. A huge fort, after which the park is named, towers over the park atop a hill. There are many ruins of bygone eras scattered all over the jungle, which give it a unique, wonderful and mixed flavour of nature, history and wildlife.Tigers at Ranthambore National park have been known to even hunt in full view of human visitors. These tigers are famous for being seen in the daytime too, due to their lack of fear of human presence in vehicles. This lack of fear of humans is excellent for tourists, as they get to see the tigers often. This National park is a wildlife enthusiast and photographer's dream. It offers excellent accommodation and internal transportation facilities. The park remains open every year from October to May.Famous for the exciting and frequent tiger sightings captured dramatically in several books, this park is today affected by ecological pressures and poaching. In Nutshell, Ranthambore National park is a wildlife enthusiast and photographer's dream. It offers excellent accommodation and internal transportation facilities and remains open every year from October to Mid June. Location: Nearest Town- Sawai Madhopur, situated on the Delhi-Bombay railway-line and also linked with Jaipur and Agra by rails. Near by Airports - Jaipur and Kota Distance by rail: Delhi - 362 km, Agra - 227 km, Bombay 1027 km, Kota - 108 km, Jaipur - 132 km Distance by road: Delhi - 480 km (via Dausa), Jaipur - 180 km (via Tonk)

  • 0 About Udaipur (Rajasthan) Travel Information

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    About Udaipur (Rajasthan) Travel Information Udaipur is situated on the banks of the lovely Lake Pichola and the lake of Fatehsagar, in Southern Rajasthan, the Eden like Udaipur, cocooned by the Aravalli Hills, is a dotted with numerous beautiful palaces, domes, shrines among other top tourist attractions. Udaipur is situated around the shimmering clear blue water lakes, which whisper the mood of a bygone era.The city was founded in 1567 AD by Maharana Udai Singh on the advice of a sage. Udaipur was last of the numerous Mewar capitals. It was in Udaipur that legendary Maharana Pratap was born. He was obsessed with Chittaur and the past glories of the Sisodia clan possessed his mind. Maharana Pratap left Udaipur to win back Chittaur from the Mughals. But he failed in his attempts and Udaipur remained the capital of Mewar till India got her independence. The memory of the failure of noble Pratap gives Udaipur its pervading mood of nostalgic wistfulness. The city acquires its scenic beauty from the Aravallis. Three lakes- Pichola, Fateh Sagar and Udai Sagar make it an oasis in the desert. Udaipur is known as the ' City of Lakes'. The two most scenic and famous lakes of the city are Lake Pichola and Lake Fateh Sagar. The Lake Palace One of the most romantic cities in Rajasthan, Udaipur is also known as the city of lakes. The marble palaces, beautifully laid out gardens and the lakes make Udaipur seem almost like a mirage in the desert.The founder of Udaipur, Maharana Udai Singh, was overcome by the misfortunes that his old capital of Chittaurgarh had to face due to repeated attacks by the Mughal armies. On the advice of a holy man, Udai Singh shifted his capital to the banks of Lake Pichola- the city was named Udaipur after him. This marble palace that seems to be floating on the Lake Pichola is undoubtedly the main attraction of Udaipur. Now a luxury hotel, this palace can be accessed by boat from the city palace which overlooks it.Other attractions in Udaipur include Krishna Vilas, Lake Fateh Sagar,Sajjan Niwas and Gulab Bagh, Machchalaya Magra, Doodh Talai, Jag Mandir, and the Bharatiya Lok Kala Museum. Jaisamand lake48 kms from the city, this artificial lake was built in 17th century by Maharana Jai Singh. The marble 'Chhatris' along the embankment add grace to this second largest lake in Asia. On either sides of the lake were built the palaces for the favourite queens of the King. People of the Bhil tribe still inhabit the islands in Jaisamand lake.Pratap Memorial: Erected atop Modi Magri is this equestrian bronze statue of the valiant hero, Maharana Pratap. Sajjan Garh, Gulab Bagh, Dudh Talai Park, the Sunset point are also the places to be seen. The City PalaceOverlooking the lake Pichola is the City Palace, a marvel of marble and granite. The largest palace in Rajasthan, its exquisite worksmanship makes it a must on every visitor's itinerary. The three mahals - Baari, Dilkush and Moti, the Suraj Gokhada of the Sun Balcony, the Mor Chowk Known for its beautiful peacock Mosaics ; the shrine of Dhuni Mata and the Museum of Rana Pratap are the highlights of this complex. Jagdeesh Temple Close to the City Palace is the Jagdish Temple which houses some imposing sculpted figures and heavily ornamented interiors. At a short distance is the Sahelion-ki-Bari or the Garden of Maidens which has four pools and delicately carved kiosks and elephants in marble. Built in the early 18th century, this is now a popular tourist spot. Sahelion-Ki-BariOn the shores of Fateh Sagar Lake was built a garden for the 48 young girls waiting to be sent to the royal house as part of dowry. This garden is laid with extensive lawns, fountains and shady walking lanes. There are four pools with dainty kiosks and fountains with elephant trunks for spouts. These gardens appear discrete and impeccable in taste. Bharatiya Lok Kala Mandal: This is a museum of folk arts, which has rich collection of folk dresses, ornaments, puppets, masks, dolls, folk musical instruments and paintings. World famous puppeteers put shows here, on request in advance.

  • 0 About Dalhousie (Himachal) Travel Information

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    About Dalhousie (Himachal) Travel Information Dalhousie is in Chamba district of Himachal Pradesh. It is built on five hills Kathlog, Potreyn, Tehra, Bakrota and Balun. It's a very beautiful hill station in Himachal Pradesh. It is surrounded by the beautiful scenery oh snow - capped peaks. It was established in 1854 by the British Empire in India as summer retreat for its troops and bureaucrats. It is located on the western edge of the Dhauladhar mountain range of the Himalayas. Out of five hills, the main hub of Dalhousie is portreyn. The most popular place in Dalhousie is the figure of eight at portreyn. Dalhousie is known as the 'gateway to Chamba'. Chamba is only 56 km from Dalhousie. Dalhousie is famous for its rains and cool weather in summer. Chamba chappals are very famous among the tourist embroidered with gold thread, can baskets, colorful woolens and life like Chamba dolls and also the Chamba shawls are very popular. There are several places of tourist interest near the hill resort of Dalhousie like Khajjair and Chamba. Ponies and dandies (local palanquins) are used for short distance trips Attraction Dalhousie: St. Andrew's Church : St. Andrew's Church was built in the year 1903 at baloon by protestant Christians and commonly known as the Church of Scotland. St. Jonh's Church: The church is approximately 2 km from the main bus stand and it stands on the Gandhi chowk. Rev. John H. Pratt came to Dalhousie in 1863 and inspired the Christian community to build a permanent church building at this place. Panchpula: Panchpula is almost 3 km. there is a very beautiful monument erected at panchpula where several streams meet at one point. That is Samadhi monument was built in memory of great sardar Ajit Singh. Khajjiar : Khajjiar is 27 km from Dalhousie. Khajjiar is one of the famous retreats among the visitors. Khajjiar is famous for the popular Khajji Naga shrine dedicated to the serpent god from which the name is believed to have been derived. The temple dates back to the 10th century and is interspaced with different patterns and images on the ceiling and wooden posts. Dainkund: : Dainkund is only 10 km. one can enjoy the beautiful view of the hills, with the rivers Ravi, Beas and chenab threading through the distance. A Devi Temple is also situated on the hill. Jandrighat Palace : This palace belongs to the Raja of Chamba. Wild varieties of strawberries can be seen all along the way. Also, Jandrighat palace shows the royal life of the Raja of Chamba. Kala Top Wildlife Sanctuary : The wildlife reserves, provides shelter to various species of flora and fauna. Kala top is a pleasant getaway, only 5 km from Dalhousie, with a panoramic view and a forest rest house. Kala Top is situated at an altitude of 8000 ft and 10 km away from G.P.O jquare. It has a variety of wildlife such as Deer, Bears & Leopards. Bakrota : Bakrota is famous in producing Tibetan carpets. From the Bakrota round also you can get a very good view of mountains. Round means a walking circuit around the hills, very popular among the residents. It is less than 5 km from the town centre. Panchpula(3 km) This is picturesque spot where a stream feeds a series of pools. A monument has been built here in memory of the freedman fighter, Sardar Ajit Singh Subhash Baoli (1 km) It was at this enchaining spot surrounded by majestic trees, that Subhash Chandra Bose spent a lot of time in 1937, contemplating and mediating.

  • 0 About Dharamsala (Himachal) Travel Information

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    About Dharamsala (Himachal) Travel Information Dharamsala is perched on the high slopes in the upper reaches of Kangra Valley. The town is divided into two distinct and widely separated sections, Upper and Lower Dharamsala, which differ almost a thousand metres in height. Dharamsala over looks the plains and is surrounded by dense pine trees and Deodar forests. A nearby snowline with numerous streams and cool healthy atmosphere makes the surroundings very attractive. Dharamsala is a busy bazaar town and has established itself as the travellers base camp, who come to explore the nearby mountains. The Kotwali Bazaar provides the entire colour and characteristic of a small town, which is mixed with the simple life style. The colourful temple and Gompas, which reflect the culture of Tibet, adds attraction for the visitor. The Kangra museum gives an overview of the rich past of the region and on the other hand there are institutes that have been established to preserve the Tibetan art, cultures and traditions. Dharamsala, popularly known as the "Queen of the Hills", is divided into lower and upper towns with a difference of 457m(1500ft.) between them. The mountains enfold 3 sides of the town and the valley stretches to the south. There is a beautiful resort of Dharamsala, which stands on the spur of the Dharamsala range Dharamsala is known for its scenic beauty, calmness and serenity. It has high pine trees, tea gardens and timber yielding trees. Dharamsala is now the seat of His Holiness, the Dalai Lama. After the Chinese conquest of his country, Dharamsala is evocative of the imperial days in places like Mcleod Ganj and Forsythe Ganj. Dharamsala is the headquarters of the Kangra district. It became the capital in 1852 and is 125 years old. An earthquake once wrecked Dharamsala in 1905. Since 1960, it became temporary headquarters of the Dalai Lama and has risen to international repute as " The little Lhasa in India". After the Indo-Chinese and Indo-Pak wars, the govt. erected war memorials of jawans and officers belonging to Kangra, who died in the war. Tibetan environment has been created in the high altitude, and more than 3000 Tibetans have made Dharamsala their temporary home, living mostly in Mcleod Ganj. To add to its beauty, there is an artificial stream flowing, gleaming with gold fish. Tibetans took shelter in India in 1959. In the wake of Dalai Lama’s flight from Tibet, 85000 Tibetans were devastated. Their spiritual leader dalai lama given up the hope of a free Tibet, but to keep the Tibetan art alive, efforts have been made to preserve them. Tibet’s unique form of Thongka painting, woodcarving, metal –crafts and music are very famous. Tibetan works and archive are preserved in the library at Dharamsala where Buddhist monks from distant refugee camps come to study ancient manuscripts Mcleod Ganj Tibet has lent importance to Mcleod Ganj. The Buddha temple is situated opposite the present abode of His Holiness, the Dalai Lama. This place is well worth a visit and around it is situated Tibetan monasteries and nunnery. A number of residential buildings, restaurants, antique and curio shops are present. There is an annual 10-day fair opera in Dharamsala, which takes place on the second saturday of April. War Memorial:It is a very beautiful place to visit in the afternoon. This memorial is built near the entry point to Dharamsala. It was built to commemorate the memory of those who fought in defense of the motherland. People offer prayers at this memorial place. Triund:It is 17km from Dharamsala and lies at the foot of the snow clad Dhauladhar at a height of 2827 m. It is a popular picnic and trekking spot. Kunnal Pathri:Just 3-km level walk from Kotwali Bazaar, is a rock temple of the local goddess at Kunnal Pathri spots Lord Eligin's Memorial:It is a world famous church built in the memory of lord Elgin, the Scottish working peer and eighth Viceroy. In 1896, he took vacations from official Shimla. He was not able to finish his four-year term and died in Dharamsala. Before his death he had given instructions to be buried in the Church of St. John. Inside the church is the monument of this Viceroy. Dal lake:The picturesque Dal Lake is about 11km from Dharamsala. It is surrounded by fir trees. There is an annual fair in Sept. and is largely attended by Gaddis and other hillmen. The Shrine of Bhagasunath:The shrine of Bhagasunath is famous for its ancient temple. It is 11km from lower town. Slate quarries are found here. There is a tank and spring which are considered sacred by the Hindus. Chamunda Devi : Chamunda Devi is the famous temple dedicated to the Goddess Chamunda Devi. It is situated in the village of Dadh, 15 km from Dharamsala. One can have a glorious view of Dhauladhar on 3 sides and the Baner Khud, Pathiar and Lahla forest. Trilokpur:It is 41km from Dharamsala, easily approachable by road. It is well known for its natural cave temple, which contains stalactite and stalagmite (hanging from the roof of the cave). This temple is dedicated to Lord Shiva. Ruins of palaces and Baradari of Lehna Singh Majitha, Governor of Kangra hills, are present high on the ridge of the cave.

  • 0 About Manali (Himachal) Travel Information

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    About Manali (Himachal) Travel Information The Kullu valley has an ancient town in its lap called Manali. Surrounded by towering peaks at an arm length, Manali's major asset is its proximity to the snowline. It is a flourishing orchard industry, a popular honeymoon destination and trailhead for numerous treks as well as a great countryside ideal for adventure sport lovers. Manali literally means the 'Home of Manu'. Manu is the mythological character who is supposed to have survived when the world was drowned in Flood. He then came to Manali and recreated human life. Thus, the area of Manali is sacred and Hindus treat the temples over here as pilgrimage. Prime Attractions of Manali Heli Skiing : For high mountain thrills perhaps nothing can surpass the magic of heli- skiing. The sport is available in the area abound by the Hanuman Tibba, Rohtang Pass, Deo Tibba and Chanderkhani Pass near Manali. Hidimba Devi Temple : Hadimba or Dhungiri temple in Manali is one of the most important temples in the region. This four story wooden temple is located in the middle of a forest called the Dhungiri Van Vihar. Mountaineering : Himachal Pradesh has some challenging peaks and each year expeditions are organised by the Mountaineering Institute at Manali. The Mountaineering Institute has regional centres at Dharamsala, Bharmour and Jispa, which organise adventure courses as well. Malana Valley : In the valleys of Kullu and Manali below Chanderkhani Pass, situated at an altitude of 2,76m is a little hub of hundred houses. The village, which consists of 1,000 tribals, has an immaculate system of self-governance. Mountaineering Institute : The Mountaineering Institute located at Manali provides training facilities for basic and advance climbing both for Indian nationals and foreigners. This institute also conducts other adventurous sports activities like high altitude trekking, minor mountaineering, rock-climbing, skiing, and high altitude rescue and relief courses. The institute has sufficient lodging and boarding arrangements and equipment can be hired for trekking purposes. Naggar : Taken as an excursion from Kullu or Manali, Nagar also known as Naggar, is a very lovely village set on a hill surrounded by forests. Naggar was the capital of Kullu valley in the 16th century and the monuments in the region are witnesses to the glory it had once lived in. Nehru Kund : It is a spring of clear, cold water, named after the late Prime Minister Jawaharlal Nehru and is 6-km from Manali on Keylong road. Temple Of Manu : Slippery stones paths lead through the old village houses up to the temple of Manu. Manali is named after the sage Manu who meditated when he came in this area. Tibetan Temple : Tibetans have a base in Manali too. There is a large modern Tibetan temple to the South of the bus stand and also a small handicrafts centre. Vashisth Village : Famous for the sweeping valley views and sulphurous hot-water springs, the large settlement of Vashisht, formerly known as Bashist, just 3km from Manali, is an amorphous jumble of traditional timber houses and modern concrete cubes, divided by paved courtyards and narrow muddy lanes. Excursions from Manali Rohtang Pass (50Km.) Rohtang Pass is the highest point, 4,112m, on the Manali-Keylong road, 51-km from Manali town. It provides a wide panoramic view of mountains rising far above clouds, which is a sight truly breath-taking. Arjun Gufa (5Km.) On the left bank of the Beas, 5-km from Manali near the village of Prini, is the 'Arjun Gufa' or the cave of Arjuna. In here Arjuna practised austerities to get Pashupata Ashtra or weapon from Lord Indra. Beas Kund (50Km.)It is the source of river Beas, at the Rohtang Pass and is easily accessible. The great sage, Vyas performed `Tapa' here during the Mahabharat times. The place is still hallowed by the celestial light. It was because of this that the river got the present name of Beas. Jagatsukh Temple (6Km.)It is one of the biggest villages in Kullu district. About 6-km from Manali, Jagatsukh is famous for its Shiva temple that is built in "shikhara" style and nearby is the old and interesting Devi Sharvati temple. Old Manali (3Km.) The old Manali area is located some 3-km from the presentday Manali. The old Manali is covered with guesthouses, which look ancient now, and orchards where the livestock move at will. Rahalla Falls (16Km.)About 16-km from Manali and 4-km away from Kothi, at the start of the climb to the Rohtang Pass, are the beautiful Rahalla Falls at an altitude of 2,501m. Solang Nullah (14Km.)14-km northwest of Manali in the Solang Valley, this place offers Himachal Pradesh's best ski slopes. The Mountaineering and Allied Sports Institute operates a 300m high ski lift and the month of February is the best month to ski over here. HPTDC runs seven-day package for ski courses with accommodation in the Hotel Rohtang Manaslu in Manali. Courses are also offered by the Mountaineering and Allied Sports Institute and the North Face Ski School. Vashisth Hot Sulphur Springs (3Km.)This small village near Manali is famous for its scenic beauty. The village has a temple dedicated to Lord Rama and Vashisth Muni. The village has some hot water springs, which are said to carry medicinal properties. It is a picturesque little place, 3-km out of Manali but on foot the distance is a bit shorter.

  • 0 About Shimla (Himachal) Travel Information

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    About Shimla (Himachal) Travel Information Shimla (also spelt as 'Simla') derives its name from goddess 'Shayamla Devi', which is another manifestation of Goddess Kali. The capital of Himachal Pradesh came into light when the British discovered it in 1819. Till then, it was a part of the Nepalese kingdom. In 1864 Shimla was declared as the summer capital of India. After Independence, Shimla became the capital of Punjab and was later named the capital of Himachal Pradesh. In 1903 a rail line was constructed between Kalka and Shimla. Shimla has been blessed with all the natural bounties, one can think of. Dwelling on a panoramic location, the hilly town is surrounded by green pastures and snow-capped peaks. The spectacular cool hills accompanied by the structures made during the colonial era create an aura, which is very different from other hill stations. Shimla's Seven Hill AttractionsThe seven hills of Shimla are - Prospect Hill in Western Shimla, which has the temple of Kamna Devi; Summer Hill in Western Shimla, which has the campus of the Himachal Pradesh University; Observatory Hill in Western Shimla, which holds the estate of the Indian Institute of Advanced Study; Invererarm in Western Shimla, whose top has the State Museum; Bantony in central Shimla, which has the Grand Hotel; Jakhoo in central Shimla, which is crowned by the temple indicated to Lord Hanuman, and Elysium in north-western Shimla, which holds Auckland House and Longwood and reaches out towards the Bharari spur. Shimla's MallsAs the town of Shimla grew through the 19th century, its Mall steadily developed as the town's commercial street and the hub of its social life. The road, which some 5-km in length, starts in the west at the gates of he former Viceregal Lodge , the present day Indian Institute of Advanced Study and ends at Chhota Shimla or 'Small' Shimla, in the east. The route has bends, as one would expect any hill road to have, ut its nature essentially follows a wide sweeping curve along the hills. The primary aspect is south facing and affords a view of the valley below the town and of the foothills that reach out to the plains from its habitation. In pockets, snatches of the northern aspect spring up for a dramatic view and hold woods of Pine and Himalayan Cedar - the majestic Deodar. This picture of nature's bounty is framed by the distant snow ranges of the Greater Himalaya. Prime Attractions of Shimla Annandale : Annandale, just 2-km below the Ridge in Shimla, offers a picturesque piece of ground, charmingly adapted for recreation in the days of the Raj. Today it affords a pleasant change from the perpetual slopes above. Chadwick Falls : -km beyond the Summer Hill and 7-km west of the ridge from Shimla are the Chadwick Falls, which was once the site of a 67-m aquatic spectacle. Chapslee : Containing the comfortable elegance of an English country manor, Chapslee was originally built in 1835. Christ Church And St Michael'S Cathedral : The most prominent building on the Mall is the yellow Christ Church, reputed to be the second oldest church in northern India. The silhouette of this can be seen on the skyline for miles around. It was designed by Colonel JT Boileau in 1844, but consecrated only after 1857. The clock was donated by Colonel Dumbleton in 1860, and the porch added in 1873. Churdhar Sanctuary : The sanctuary got its name from the Chur Peak, on the top of which sits a majestic status of Lord Shiva. One is sure to come across a large number of multi-coloured and agile Monals in the adjoining forests. Gurkha Castles : The Gurkha castles in Solan, Sirmour, Bilaspur and Shimla districts remind us of the life and time under the Gurkha regime. While most of the structures built by the Gurkhas have crumbled, the remaining few beckon tourists. Hatkoti : Some 105-km east of Shimla, in Jubbal Tehsil on the banks of the river Pabbar, lays the mysterious valley of stone temples Hatkoti. Close by stands a small village by the name of Parhaat. Jakhu Temple : No visit to the state capital Shimla is complete without visiting Jakhu Hill. This hill looms over Shimla town and is the geographical nucleus. The Hanuman temple at the top of Jakhu hill is the highest point in town.

  • 0 Bodhgaya Land of Enlightment

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    About Bodhgaya Information Three hundred years before Alexandria was founded, about the time that Thales, the most ancient philosopher of Europe was teaching in Greece, that water is the origin of all things, the soul of the world; and Zoroaster, in Media or Persia, was systematizing the fire-worship of the Magi; and Confucius in China, was calling on the teeming multitudes around him to offer the guardian spirits and the manes of their ancestors; and Nebuchadnezzar was setting up his golden image in the plains of Dura; and Daniel was laboring in Babylon to establish the worship of the true God in Judea; a reverend sage who had left a throne for philosophy, was traveling from Bodhgaya to Benares, and from Benares to Kanouj, exhorting the people against theft, falsehood, adultery, killing, and intemperance. In the year 563 B. C. on the Full Moon Day of V aisakha in the kingdom of Kapilavastu a young prince was born to King Suddhodana and Queen Mahamaya in the royal Lumbini grove under a Sal Tree. On the fifth day of his birth he was named ‘Siddhartha' and on the seventh day his mother expired. Prajapati Gautami, the younger sister of Mahamaya, who also was his step-mother, took care of the young child like any other mother would do. During the formative years of Prince Siddhartha, he received his early education and was trained in warfare and administration but he was often found immersed in deep - thoughts regarding the suffering and miseries of humanity. He was opposed to exploitation of man by man, inequality, poverty, violence, class and caste system. When he attained the age of sixteen he was married to a very beautiful and charming Princess Yashodhara, daughter of the Koliya King Dandapani of Devadaha.When Siddhartha was 29 Years old Yashodhara gave birth to a beautiful son named Rahula and this he termed as another impediment to keep him attached to worldly life. He left his palace leaving behind his parents, his beautiful wife and the new born Rahula in search of a way that would free mankind or humanity from the cycle of suffering.Since then Prince Siddhartha who became a parivrajaka wandered forth to several teachers in search of the Truth that would end the cycle of birth and death. He went to dense forests and dark caves, and met many teachers, practised penance and self- mortification and studied their doctrines and disciplines but all these were not sufficient to satisfy him for what he earnestly sought for and he practiced these severe austerities for six long years without taking food nor drink and as a result of which he turned into a mere skeleton.Realizing that the practice of severe austerities would lead him to death he left his friends and came to the east bank of the river Niranjana where he was offered Kheer (rice-pudding = rice cooked with milk and sugar) by Sujata, daughter of the chief of the village Senani. Accepting the dâna (offer) of Sujata he crossed river Niranjana and came to Uruvela on the same day and in the evening he prepared a seat of kusa grass and sat beneath the peepal tree facing eastwards. The Bodhisattva Siddhartha who was determined to reach the truth started his fight against Mara, the Evil One sitting for meditation with a strong determination (adhitthâna) that unless and until he cannot find out the truth he would not get up from the seat, come what may.All the efforts of Mara failed to disturb and distract Siddhartha from his seat and on the full Moon day of Vaisâkha during the last watch of the night at the age of 35 years he attained Supreme Enlightenment and came to be known as the Buddha which means the All Knowing One, the All Compassionate One, One who can show us the Truth to end all Suffering for which He is also called the Bhagawân, Sugato, Samyak Sambuddha and Tathâgata and the seat of His Enlightenment is called the 'Vajråsana' or the 'Diamond Throne' and the Tree under which He attained Enlightenment is known as the 'Bodhi Tree' the botanical name being the 'Ficus Religiosa'.After attaining Enlightenment, the Buddha spent seven more weeks in meditation in seven different places around the Bodhi Tree contemplating his stupendous achievement for this human life, because to be born as a human being is very rare an opportunity.THE DHAMMA (TEACHING OF THE BUDDHA)The Buddha then set out for Varanasi where at the Deer Park (Mrigadayavana) in Isipatana, modern Sarnath where the first sermon (the Dhammachakka pavattana) was expounded or the setting in motion the Wheel of the Law to the first five disciples who earlier were in the initial years closely associated with Siddhartha for six long years, exhorting them to avoid the two extremes of self-indulgence and self mortification. Self-indulgence leads to retardation of spiritual progress and the latter weakens one's intelligence. The Buddha expounded the Dhamma based on the Four Noble Truths i.e., Dukkha (Suffering) , the cause of Dukkha (Suffering), the cessation of Dukkha (Suffering) and the path leading to the cessation of Dukkha which was through Ârya Atthangika Magga (the Noble Eightfold Path) consisting of Right Speech, Right Action, Right Livelihood, Right Effort, Right Mindfulness, Right Concentration, Right Understanding and Right Thought. The Dhamma which is based on the three pillars of Sila (Morality), Samâdhi (Concentration) and Prajñâ (Wisdom) which in other words is also called the Middle Way or the righteous way of life. The Buddha established the Sangha or the Order of Monks for the creation of an ideal society based on Mettâ (loving-kindness), Karunâ (compassion), Muditâ (sympathetic joy) and Upekkhâ (equanimity) which was free from class, caste and colour prejudices and maintained equality, freedom, justice, fraternity and brotherhood.Love, mercy, patience, self-denial, alms-giving, truth, and the cultivation of wisdom, he required of all. Good actions, good words, and good thoughts were the frequent subjects of his sermons; and he was unceasing in his cautions to keep the mind free from the turmoil of passion, and the cares of life.Buddhism which embraced those doctrines, together with the systems of worship that have grown out of it, has numbered more adherents and influenced more men, than any other system of belief historically known-perhaps than all others together.Buddhism, however, according to a true definition of the word religion, or any purely technical use of the term, is not a religion. It does truly admit, in a modified way, nearly the whole pantheon of early Hinduism and all the demons, ghosts, spirits and fairies that belong to the wild superstitions of the peoples; but yet it nowhere admits any real god on any superhuman being worthy of worship; it has no temples; it admits neither altars nor sacrifices; it has no true priests; it knows no prayers, no ritual, no religious rites of any kind.Buddhism is simply an atheistic system of Philosophy and Ethics-a Philosophy of humanity in its environment, so clear, so profound, so positive, that it is destined not only to astonish, but to largely modify, at no distant day, the thought of the West. Ethics which have already begun to awaken surprise and admiration in many who had not believed that any good thing could come out of heathenism.In a broader, more popular use of the word, however, Buddhism is a religion : and is rightly studied as such in connection with other great religions that have influenced large masses of men.A religion is always a growth. No religion ever started as an absolutely new and completely perfected system; but each, with constant changes, developed out of something, or in connection with something, that went before. Curiously enough, this word growth in this connection partakes of both senses in which it is used, respectively, of organic development and of inorganic increase; for in religion, there is always something that, like the principle of life, itself-developing from within, according to regular organic law, while, at the same time, there are whole masses of outer accretions like the glittering stalactites and stalagmites of a calcareous cavern, or the slimy alluvial flats of a great river delta.The Buddha in course of 45 years of his ministry moved from village to village, town to town, city to city along with His retinue of monks following His own prescribed dictum 'Bahujana Hitâya, Bahujana Sukhaya' and finally at the age of 80 he attained Mahaparinibbana (left His body in meditation) lying between two Sal trees. It is an event of unique significance that all the three events of the Buddha, His Birth, Enlightenment and Mahaparinibbana all took place in the forest and beneath the trees and all happened at a single day on the full Moon Day of Vaisâkha in the Sal grove at Kusinara, modern Kushinagar.MAHABODHI MAHAVIHARAThe Mahabodhi Mahavihara or more popularly known as the Bodhgaya Temple or the Great Stupa, is one of the shrines out of the 84000 shrines erected by King Asoka the Great in the 3rd century B.C. The Mahabodhi Mahavihara is the sole surviving example of what was once an architectural genre. How long it took to create this magnificent structure or whose creation it is still remains a mystery and for the lack of a comprehensive historical data this subject remains a controversy till date. However, throughout the centuries, this blessed site has retained its deep spiritual vibration and inspired countless beings towards a saintly life and the vihâra itself stands out as an eye catching artistic landmark as if standing testimony towards the presence of the greatest Teacher of all time mankind has ever witnessed.A graphic and comprehensive description of the Mahabodhi complex is left by Huen Tsang, a Chinese pilgrim who visited Buddhagaya in 637 A.D. About the Mahabodhi Temple he says :“To the east of the Bodhi tree, there is a vihara about 160 or 170 feet high. Its lower foundation-wall is 20 or more paces in its face. The building is of blue bricks covered with chunam (burnt stone lime) all the niches in the different stones hold golden figures. The four sides of the building are covered with wonderful ornamental work : in one place figures of stringed pearls (garlands), in another, figures of heavenly rishis. The whole is surrounded by gilded copper amalaka fruit. The eastern face adjoins a storied pavilion, the projecting caves of which rise one over the other to the height of three distinct chambers; its projecting caves, its pillars, beams, doors, and windows are decorated with gold and silver ornamental work with pearls and gems let in to fill up interstices”.The original fabric of the present Mahabodhi temple, which notwithstanding the simplicity of design and decoration, is of unique importance, being the sole survivor of a style of architecture which was in vogue in this region and of which vestiges are still in existence in the ruined temples at Nalanda and a few other places. Curiously enough it retains the dimensions and broad features which characterized it in the time of Huen Tsang.The Temple underwent several restorations, renovations and repairs in subsequent periods by a number of devout Kings, donors and philanthropists of home and abroad. A very thorough renovation of the Temple was taken up during 1874 by the deputations of the Burmese King, Mindon-Min, with the permission of the Government of India but subsequently completed in 1884 under the supervision of Sir Alexander Cunningham and Beglar. This Temple suffered much at the hands of time due to man made miseries and natural calamities especially during the reign of King Shashanka of Gour (Bengal). Important Places The sacred Bodhi Tree -The sacred Bodhi tree - the shades under which the Siddhartha Gautama meditated and attained Enlightenment on the full Moon day of Vaisakh Purnima (May month). This peepal tree’s botanical name is ficus religiosa. It was under this tree that the Buddha spent the first week in meditation after attaining Enlightenment. The present tree is probably the fifth succession of the original tree which was earlier destroyed several times by man-made misery and natural calamities.Vajrasana -Vajrasana or the Diamond Throne is the seat of the Buddha’s Enlightenment. Built in the 3rd century B.C. by Emperor Asoka, it is made of red sand stone. Venerable Ashwaghosa in his Buddhacarita reveals that this is the Navel of the Earth. Fa-Hien mentions that all the past Buddhas attained Enlightenment here and the future Buddhas too will attain the enlightenment on this spot.Animesha Lochana Chaitya -Situated on the north east of the Mahabodhi Temple, this is the place where the Buddha spent the second week in meditation in standing posture gazing at the Bodhi Tree with motionless eyes for one whole week.Cankamana -This is the place where the Buddha spent the third week in meditation practicing the walking meditation, otherwise, called the Cankamana or the cloister walk. The raised platforms with lotus flowers mark the spot where the Buddha kept his feet while walking.Ratanaghara -The Ratanaghara or the Jewel House is the place where the Buddha spent the fourth week in meditation. Situated in the north-west of the Temple, the Buddha meditated here reflecting on the Patthana or the Law of Dependent Origination. A ray of six colours was said to have emanated from his body during that period and the Buddhists have designed their flag based on these colours.Ajapala Nigrodha Tree -The pillar marks the spot where the tree once stood marking the place where the Buddha spent the fifth week in meditation after his attainment of Enlightenment and delivered a discourse on the equality of mankind.Muchalinda Sarovar -The place where the Buddha spent the sixth week in meditation after his Enlightenment. While the Buddha was in meditation, a severe thunder storm broke out and seeing the Buddha getting drenched, the snake king of the Lake called Muchalinda came out of his abode and protected the Buddha with his hood from the violent wind and rains.Rajayatna Tree -Situated in the south of the Temple, this is the tree under which the Buddha spent a week in meditation. It is said that two merchants from Burma (presently Myanmar) named Tapassu and Bhallika while passing this way offered rice cake and honey to the Buddha and took refuge in the Buddha and His teachings ‘Buddham Saranam Gachami, Dhammam Saranam Gachami’ but they could not take refuge in the Sangham because the Sangha was not constituted then, thus they became the first lay devotees in the Buddhist world.Meditation Park -The park situated at the south-east of the temple is newly developed as a Meditation park. It has facilities for meditation huts, congregation and discussion courts and two huge prayer bells and two water fountains besides a lotus pond. RIVER NIRANJANA River Niranjana, running South to North, on the bank of which Bodhgaya is situated. River Niranjana has an important place in Buddhism. Buddhist Literature places on record how before his attaining Buddha hood the ascetic Siddhartha was charmingly impressed by this locality on his first arrival here. His impression finds a marvelous expression in the following measured terms. "Pleasantly picturesque is this part of land. Delightful is the sight of the grassy woodland. The river Niranjana is flowing on in glossy stream, showing the bathing places with gradual descents of steps, presenting a charming land scape, and affording glimpses into the neighboring hamlets easy to access. This must needs be the fitting place for a scion of a noble race strenously striving after the highest attainments.”SUJATA-KUTI (Sujata Gadh)The Excavation Branch of the Archaeological Survey of India undertook excavation at the ancient site of Bakraur(Sujata-Kuti), near Bodhaya, located on the right bank of the river Niranjana. The site, that is situated just north of the village, is traditionally known by various names like, Sujata Kuti, Sujatagarh and Sujata Quila, named after the maiden Sujata, the daughter of the chief of the village. It was she who offered milk-rice pudding or kheer to the Buddha after he had undergone severe austerities for six years to gain Enlightenment. The stupa, which was constructed to perpetuate the memory of the maiden Sujata, is 11mt. high from the ground level. Unfortunately, through the years because of inefficient care has been severely destroyed to collect baked bricks, caskets and reliquaries. Several plaques of the Buddha in bhumisparsha-mudra, made probably of plaster and surprisingly light in weight, were found near the damaged top of the stupa. Encased in lime plaster, the maximum diameter of the stupa in the last stage was about 65.50 m. Mud-mortar of varying thickness was used as a binding medium in the construction of the stupa. The railings and pillars were made of stone.It has not been possible to date the different stages of the stupa with certainty. The last phase of the stupa, however, can be assigned to a date between eighth and tenth century A.D., on the basis of terracotta sealing and plaques. It is quite likely that the religious zeal of the Pala Kings were responsible for the enclosure wall, railing and the gateway. The earliest occupation of the site may be placed in the second-first century B.C. on the basis of fragments of dark grey polished ware found in a partially exposed monastery-like structure towards the north-east of the stupa. The important finds of the excavation include a fragmentary ear-ornament of gold; small terracotta plaques; beads of agate and terracotta; a punch-marked coin; head, torso and multiple Buddha in stone; a few ornamental pieces; and a terracotta sealing. PRAGBODHI CAVES (DUNGESHWARI HILLS) The hill is situated about 3 miles to the north-east of Buddhagaya on the eastern bank of the river Phalgu. The hill had been identified by Cunningham with the Pragbodhi mountain of the Buddhist tradition, where the Buddha is said to have lived for six years before he proceeded to Uruvela, i.e., modern Buddhagaya. The identification is based on the fact, that, half way up the western slope of the hill, facing the river Phalgu, is a natural fissure or cavern, shaped like a crescent, 37’x5½’, with a small entrance 3’ 2’’ wide and 4’ 10’’ high, where the Buddha is said to have lived. Both Fa Hian and Hiuen Tsang visited and described the cave of the Pragbodhi mountain and their accounts, according to Cunningham, would perhaps refer to this cave. The height of the cave at the other end i.e. southern end is hardly 2’ 7’’, while the width is 1’ 7’’. At the back or east side of the cavern there is a ledge of rock, which probably served as a pedestal for the shadow of Buddha also figures on the rock. At present there is a small temple that is maintained by the Tibetan monks and just above the temple there is a cave which sheltered the Bodhisattva during his stay there. Below that the pilgrims can see the foundations of a large monastic complex and on the top of the mountain the ruins of several ancient stupas. The peaceful environment around Pragbodhi, its wild beauty and the powerful presence can be felt in the cave made it worth visiting. EXCURSION FROM BODHGAYA GAYA A place of religious sanctity for Hindus, Gaya lies 12 kms from Bodhgaya between Pretshila and Ramshila hills and is washed by the shores of river Phalgu. Gaya has a large number of Buddhist temples also. While Buddha was doing severe penance, he became weak, tired and hungry. He rested under a tree where, he was offered food by a condemned village woman named Sujata. To everybody's surprise Buddha accepted her offerings. Legend has it, that after having consumed the food, Buddha's countenance assumed a divine glow and he realized the Supreme truth; that neither extreme self indulgence nor self mortification is ever required. What is needed is to follow the Middle Path. Sujata Sthan or Durgeshwari Temple stands as a symbol commemorating this event. Rajgir:Just 15 kms from Nalanda is located the complex of temples and monasteries. The place is called Rajgir. It is one of the most important tourist places in India. Being located in a valley, Rajgir is a very scenic place. Nalanda90 kms south of Patna, literally means the place that confers the lotus. It was one of the oldest universities of the world. It has nine million books, ten thousand students, two thousand teachers and was a center of great learning which reached its zenith between 5th and 12th Century A.D. Both Lord Buddha and Lord Mahavira visited this place. Emperor Ashoka built a Vihara, while Emperor Harshvardhan donated a 26 mtr. High copper image of Buddha and Emperor Kumar Gupta built a college of fine arts. In 1951, an International Center for Buddhist Studies was established in Nalanda. Nava Nalanda Vihar, 2 kms from here, is a similar institution. BARABAR CAVES The chief architectural remains, before the Gupta period, other than stupas and their surrounding gateways and railings, are artificial caves, excavated for religious purposes. Early specimens show a slavish imitation of carpentry that proves conclusively that the art of building in stone was still not fully developed. Two caves of Barabar Hill, 61.5 km. north of Bodhgaya, are in the form of a plain rectangular outer hall, at one end of which there is an inner chamber with a curved wall and overhanging caves. The caves were evidently substituted for a standardized religious meeting place consisting of a round thatched hut standing in a courtyard, and their designer could not transcend the pattern to which he had been used. Similar dependence on wooden models is evident in many other features of design until the Gupta period. The caves of the Barabar and Nagarjuni Hills are unadorned, with the exception of one at Nagarjuni, near Barabar, which has a comparatively simple carved entrance, added during or soon after the Mauryan period. The inner walls of all the caves are finely polished, no doubt by workmen of the school that was responsible for the polish of the Asokan columns. The Barabar caves, a fine specimen of workmanship needs to be added in the scheme of things for tourism development and if connected within the surroundings of Buddhagaya it sure will evoke much interest in the visitors. Deo : 20 kms from Gaya is located the Sun temple of Deo. In fact, this place is famous for the 'Chhat' festival, which is held in the month of October-November.

  • 0 Bangalore IT City

    5.00 of 1 votes

    About Bangalore Travel Information Bangalore is a booming city and considered fifth largest and the fastest growing city in Asia. Home to well over 6 million people, and a base for over 10,000 industries, Bangalore combines a quaint old world charm with the hustle and bustle of a modern metropolitan city. It is a delightful place with an amalgamation of various rich cultures, crafts, and heritage centers. This city while enjoying the reputation of being a modern, high-tech city, still offers a lot of places of historical interest for the avid sightseer to explore. A trip around the city can be very interesting and provides a varied sightseeing experience with Palaces, museums, temples, churches and gardens. It has an enviable posterity and presents much to be discovered. Despite being one of Asia's fastest growing cities, Bangalore remains one of the most elegant metros in India.A well-planned city, with tree-lined avenues,a large number of parks, gardens and lakes,Bangalore is aptly called India's garden city. Bangalore is even gaining the status of the "Floriculture Capital of India" due to the present blossoming of flower exports from the city. The beautiful parks like the Lalbagh and Cubbon Park are indeed a treat to the eyes. Take a tour of the wonderful places you can go sight seeing in Bangalore by clicking at the links to your right. Sightseeing 1. Bull Temple – It is situated in Basavanagudi ( Basava means bull in Kannada). It is the oldest temple built in the Dravidian style by Kempe Gowda, founder of Bangalore and has a monolithic Nandi, the bull (vahana or vehicle of Lord Shiva). Karnataka Tourism website tells me the imposing sculpture of Nandi measures 4.57 meters in height in height and 6.10 meters in length. There is a legend associated with the temple. You can also see the famous Dodda Ganesh temple next to the Bull temple. Apparently there is a huge monolithic statue of Lord Ganapathi about 18 ft in height and 16 ft in width, coated with kilos of butter. We didn’t have time to visit that temple so no photos. Timings of Bull Temple : 6 am to 8 pm. Vidhana SoudhaBangalore's best-known landmark, the Vidhana Soudha houses the Legislative Chambers of the State Government. This 46-metre high edifice was built almost entirely of granite and is a masterpiece of temple architecture. Government Museum Government MuseumThis beautiful 125 year-old structure with its Corinthian columns houses one of the oldest museums in the city. The museum boasts an exquisite collection of coins, sculptures, inscriptions, old paintings and excavated items. Cubbon ParkThis 135 year-old park is a 300 acre oasis of greenery in the heart of modern Bangalore. The park was laid out in 1864 by Lord Cubbon, the then viceroy of India. The red Gothic structures of the State Central Library and the High Court enrich the natural beauty of the park. The park houses a number of significant institutions like the Cheshire Dyer Memorial Hall, Ottawa Chatter, Museum, Century Club and the Press Club. Visvesvaraya Industrial & Technological MuseumThe museum is a tribute to the brilliance of Sir M. Visvesvaraya, one of the architects of modern Karnataka. Highlights of the museum include 5 galleries, namely Engine Hall, Electronic Technology Gallery, Kimbe Paper Metals Gallery, Popular Science Gallery and Children's' Science Gallery. The museum even has an airplane and a steam engine on display in its compound. Some of the exhibits are interactive too!. Lal Bagh GardensThe rulers of this region in the 18th century, Hyder Ali and his son Tipu Sultan, laid out a paradise-like garden, which sprawled over 240 acres. The garden was graced with rare trees from Persia, Afghanistan and France. This expanse of greenery is now one of India's most beautiful botanical gardens. At the heart of the gardens is situated the Glass House, whose design was inspired by the Crystal Palace in London. Flower shows are held here every January and August. Nandi HillsThis is a well-known tourist spot, 60 km from Bangalore on the road to Devanahalli. Tipu's Drop is a spot that affords dramatic views of the valley below. Legend has it that Tipu let captured soldiers plunge to their deaths from this precipice. . The best time to visit Nandi Hills is between July and February. Shiva StatueThis 65-foot high statue depicts Lord Shiva seated in Lotus position with a the backdrop of Mount Kailash with the river Ganga flowing from his matted locks. The statue is lit at night and looks looks really majestic. Sri Gavi Gangadhar-Eshwara TempleThis is a cave temple, which can lay claim to being both an architectural and scientific marvel. On Makara Sankranthi day during January every year, a ray of sunlight passes precisely through the horns of the stone bull outside the temple and illuminates the deity, the Shiva Linga, inside the cave.

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